TOUGHER PENALTIES FOR SERIOUS ANIMAL CRUELTY

29/03/2014

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Animals will be safer under a tough new offence designed to protect all of Queensland’s creatures, great and small.

 

Member for Kallangur, Mr Trevor Ruthenberg, welcomed the announcement by Attorney-General Jarrod Bleijie of a new serious animal cruelty offence that will crack down on animal torture.

 

“Animals are part of the family for many in my community and they deserve to be protected from people who think it is ok to hurt them,” Mr Ruthenberg said.

 

“I have shared the community’s frustration when offenders, who have done terrible things to animals, have walked from court without serving actual jail time.”

 

The new indictable offence of serious animal cruelty will carry a maximum penalty of seven years in prison and it will target people who intentionally inflict severe pain and suffering upon an animal.

 

“This fills a gap in my community’s expectations about how offenders who torture defenceless animals are dealt with,” Mr Ruthenberg added.

 

“The link between animal cruelty and the future abuse of people is well documented so this new offence will also act as a preventative measure.”

 

Member for Pine Rivers, Mr Seath Holswich, said the reforms built upon increased penalties for existing animal cruelty offences.

 

“Just a few months ago, the Government also increased the maximum penalty for animal cruelty from two years in prison or a $110,000 fine to four years in prison or a $220,000 fine,” Mr Holswich said.

 

“My community told me loud and clear that violence against animals should not to be tolerated, and our Government has listened.”